Getting Started with Python

This article will walk through the basics of getting Python setup on your system in order to run ZOS-API.  There are 2 required downloads (Python and pywin32) along with a few recommended downloads (an IDE and Python modules).  Except for the 2 required downloads, all other recommendations are based on a Zemax Engineer's personal preference and do not reflect an official endorsement as to the quality of these products or any competitiors.

CONTENTS:

Authored By: Michael Humphreys

Published On: November 14, 2016


How to Connect to the ZOS-API with the Interactive Extension using Matlab

In this article, we will show how to connect to the ZOS-API with the new Interactive Extension using Matlab. The Interactive Extension mode is almost identical to a User Extension except an Interactive Extension does not have to be a standalone executable. This capability allows connections from scripting environments such as Matlab or Python where there is no compiled executable that OpticStudio can launch. 
 

Authored By: Thomas Pickering

Published On: August 29, 2016


ZOS-API using MATLAB

This article is intended to provide sample code for performing specific actions using the ZOS-API through MATLAB.  For similar examples in Python, please click here.  For more general information about the ZOS-API, please instead visit the resources listed below.

CONTENTS:

  1. Sequential Single Ray Trace
  2. Create NSC and Insert Object
  3. Change Parameter in Sequential
  4. Create Solve in Sequential
  5. Insert Operand (Index To 10 Decimal Points)
  6. Run an NSC Ray Trace with Filter String
  7. Read Data from a ZRD File
  8. Sequential Batch Raytrace

Authored By: Michael Humphreys

Published On: September 20, 2016


ZOS-API using Python

This article is intended to outline differences between using Python and other ZOSAPI languages and review how Python (2.x) handles enumerated variables.  Working sample code snippets are provided.  
For MATLAB examples, please click here.  For more general information about the ZOS-API, please instead visit the resources listed below.

CONTENTS:

Authored By: Michael Humphreys

Published On: June 28, 2016


Modeling Optics with Realistic Edge Apertures

OpticStudio 16 offers a comprehensive way to model realistic lens apertures with opto-mechanical semi-diameters. Three separate apertures (semi-diameter, chip zone, and mechanical semi-diameter) offer the ability to define a lens component the same way it is made.

Authored By: Thomas Aumeyr

Published On: April 15, 2016


How to create a User Analysis using ZOS-API

In this article, we will show how to create a User Analysis using the new ZOS-API.NET.

  • Vary thickness of a surface in steps of 10 μm
  • Run QuickFocus to bring image plane into focus
  • For each step, calculate FFT MTF at several spatial frequencies
  • Plot data

Authored By: Thomas Aumeyr

Published On: November 26, 2015


Array ray tracing in Zemax OpticStudio from Python using the DDE extension

This article describes how to trace large number of rays in Zemax OpticStudio using a Python-based DDE1 extension called PyZDDE.

1Although the DDE extension has been superseded by the new and excellent .NET based extension in the latest release of OpticStudio, Zemax will most likely retain the DDE interface for the foreseeable future.      

Authored By: Indranil Sinharoy (Lyle School of Engineering, Southern Methodist University, Dallas), Julian Stuermer (Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, US)

Published On: September 4, 2015


Interfacing to OpticStudio from Mathematica

This article provides an example of the standalone method, in which the external application is Mathematica. A Mathematica notebook is used as a user interface and scripting language. It will start an OpticStudio session, load an existing lens file, manipulate that lens file to alter the lens design, perform an analyses, and obtain and process the results to provide information not directly available through OpticStudio.

Published On: May 3, 2015


ZOS-API.NET: An Overview

An application programming interface (API) for OpticStudio enables connections to, and customization of, the application using the latest software technology.

Published On: May 3, 2015


How To Compile An Extension Using Microsoft Visual Studio Express 2012

This article describes how to compile an Extension using the Microsoft Visual Studio C++ compiler.

 

Authored By: Alison Yates

Published On: February 18, 2014


Displaying results 1-10 (of 91)
 |<  < 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 8 - 9 - 10  >  >|